5 Reasons Why Fly Fishing is Good For You

5 Reasons Why Fly Fishing is Good For You

Fishing is one of the great American pastimes as a poll has revealed that as many as 33 million people aged 16 or older participate in the activity. Recreational fishing ranks even higher than playing basketball, soccer, softball or bowling, and more Americans fish than play golf and tennis combined. Apart from the satisfaction of catching your own fish, fly fishing has many health benefits, and it also has been shown to improve one’s quality of life. If you’ve never tried fly fishing before, you may want to try it out sometime to see how it can impact your entire well-being.

Trends in fly fishing
Fishing has become extremely popular in the country. Previously, the activity was associated with senior men, but a study has found that a high percentage of young female participants are taking up the sport. In the research, it was found that 43.9% of youth who are interested in fishing are female. Moreover, fly fishing has the highest rate of new participants among all the fishing categories as almost 13% of participants were new to fly fishing in 2014. It is expected that there will be more fly fishing enthusiasts in the future as fishing can positively impact one’s health in various ways.

Here are five reasons why fly fishing is good for you.

It relieves stress
A study has shown that many Americans take up fly fishing as a way to relieve stress. In the research, 38% of people who take up the pastime said they think that the soothing sound of flowing water and the pull of a fishing line is enough to drive their stress away. Being constantly stressed can lead to a host of health problems including obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Continue reading “5 Reasons Why Fly Fishing is Good For You”

Four Nights Four Rivers

Four Nights Four Rivers

Day 1

Four nights and four rivers. That was the plan. My Dad and I were going to head out on our Harleys, with all our fishing gear, and take a tour of Colorado rivers. Since it was the middle of July, we knew we’d hit a little a rain, but we ended up riding through a lot more than we bargained for. The first day was going to be the longest day of riding. We left Denver at a decent time, and the plan was to try and outrun the rain, making it over Wolf Creek Pass while it was still dry.

Half the fun for the trip though, started long before we ever left. After we had decided where and when we were going, there was still the pretty big task of trying to figure out how to fit everything for a trip like that on a motorcycle. There were a few fishing things that were a must; waders, boots, 7 piece rod to fit in the saddlebags (and a Tenkara rod for good measure since they don’t take up any space), and my new Patagonia Stealth Atom Sling Pack. Of course, there were also some motorcycle things that were a must; a cover, helmet, jacket, gloves, chaps, and enough clothes that I wouldn’t be able to smell myself too much on the last day while heading down the road at 80 mph. Continue reading “Four Nights Four Rivers”

My Take On The Tentsile Stingray Tree Tent

My Take On The Tentsile Stingray Tree Tent

Last weekend I had the chance to try out an interesting new tent. If you know anything about them though, the word tent doesn’t really describe it at all. I tried out the Tentsile Stingray Tree Tent. It’s a pretty awesome setup, that seems to be a cross between a hammock and a tent. First, let me tell you a little about my experience with it, then I’ll highlight some of the great features, and a few things that took some getting used to.

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Fly Tying Tools Of The Trade

Fly Tying Tools Of The Trade

If you’re anything like me, walking into the local fly shop and throwing down $3.00 for a fly is just painful. I remember purchasing a big hopper in Eastern Idaho for a specific stretch of water. Given the cost, I “wisely” opted to buy only one. Three casts later, a large brown took it off the surface as soon as the bug hit. After what seemed like a few seconds he broke me off, and my hopper was never seen again, at least, not by me. It is experiences like this that have led me to tie my own flies, as well as times I’ve fished waters with zero luck, only to notice the hatches and make mental notes. After some time at the vise and a little creativity, I’ve come back with my own fly and left with success. But, if your Grandpa didn’t teach you to tie and you’re new to the sport, where should you start? Below are a few of the essential tools of the fly tying trade. All recommendations are items that I personally own and tie flies with.

Learn to tie flies that you can fish on
Warm water species are fun to chase on flies you’ve designed. A bluegill hits a top water hopper of my own creation.

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The Road Less Travelled

The Road Less Travelled

To state the obvious: there are many ways to get to Yellowstone National Park. It is a huge tract of land (over 3,472 square miles) lying at an odd-shaped joining of Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana. Most guide books recommend that if you have time, and trust me, you will want to set aside a bit of time, then plan to spend a few days in the different parts of the park with accommodation nearby. This will cut down on travel time and allow you to immerse yourself in the experience a whole lot more.

After much research, our plans took us from LAX through Denver and on to Jackson Hole, Wyoming. This has to be one of the most breathtaking airports in the world, with a backdrop of the Grand Tetons and the Snake River only a short hike away. Touching down we knew our adventure had begun.

Jackson Hole, Wyoming. One of the most spectacular airports in the States.

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Lighten Up: How Downsizing Your Fly Fishing Gear Can Extend Your Opportunities

Lighten Up: How Downsizing Your Fly Fishing Gear Can Extend Your Opportunities

I stand knee-deep in moderate current, eyeing the grassy bank across and slightly downstream from me. I’ve walked to the end of my street to access a shallow, rocky reach of the river that runs through my backyard.

I strip some line and make a false cast; strip some more and make another. I surprise myself when the size 12 foam spider I tied 30 minutes before lands softly in an eddy. I am delighted when it disappears in a boil of water.

I slow the line with my rod hand and begin retrieving with my stripping hand. My rod bends nearly double as the fish at the end of my line makes a run for a submerged tree branch.

I’m grinning like a kid on Christmas morning by now. I’ll admit, I may even have let out a little “whoop!”

I bring the fish to hand and crouch to admire the brightly-colored 8 inches of fury that I have captured.

It was the beginning. Continue reading “Lighten Up: How Downsizing Your Fly Fishing Gear Can Extend Your Opportunities”

5 Ways to Stay Warm While Winter Hammock Camping

As warm temperatures fade like the autumn leaves, so do thoughts of your next hammock camping trip. But while saying goodbye to summer is inevitable, saying goodbye to hammock camping isn’t. Say hello to winter hammock camping.

After all, camping in colder temperatures does have its advantages. You’ll encounter fewer people, making your excursion more peaceful, and you won’t have to worry about snakes or bears. Additionally, you’ll see nature in its winter coat, which is quite beautiful, while hanging in a hammock.

So here are 5 ways to stay warm while winter hammock camping, or anytime you want to stay snug as a bug sleeping in a hammock.

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ENO House Fly Rain Tarp shown with ENO Blaze Underquilt

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That First Fly Rod & A Boy’s Journey To Fly Fishing

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The catch! What a beauty!

Getting your first fly rod is an intensely personal moment. Mine was a one-piece fiberglass model handmade with care and patience by my grandfather.

It was a beautiful thing – a tawny blank of indeterminate weight with black wraps or maybe brown and a wooden handle. Matched to a 7 weight floating line, it seemed to do a great job of casting. I was just getting into fly fishing and was being Continue reading “That First Fly Rod & A Boy’s Journey To Fly Fishing”