Fly Fishing For Spring’s Gray Ghosts

Fly Fishing For Spring’s Gray Ghosts

The desperate urge strikes every year, sometimes as early as January, and it grows stronger with every warm day. Grayling come from the arctic, but ironically, we have to wait for winter’s grip to ebb before they re-emerge from the ethereal depths of imagination. So the memory of billowing iridescent sails takes hold, and I wait.

We need snow to fill our lakes and reservoirs so we can keep the forests lush and green through summer and to fill streams with cold, clear water for trout, char, and whitefish, and for something else too: Arctic Grayling. Continue reading “Fly Fishing For Spring’s Gray Ghosts”

What it takes to be an Umpqua Fly

What it takes to be an Umpqua Fly

Umpqua has been producing the highest quality flies—in fact, the company is only interested in bringing the best to market. So, how do we insure that our quality is actually the highest?

First and foremost—our fly selection is extremely extensive and extremely picky. Many of Umpqua’s flies are created by our Signature Royalty Tyers. We select the best flies that come from extremely talented and innovative tyers. The submissions are put through their paces—on and off the water. Read more about the process in our next article. Once a fly is selected by our Fly Selection Committee, we work closely with the tyer to make sure the design specs are exact. That way, our factories can (practically) perfectly produce their bug. Continue reading “What it takes to be an Umpqua Fly”

Cabin Fever Fly Tying

Cabin Fever Fly Tying

Chasing winter steelhead can be more than a challenge as anglers fight changing water levels, punishing rain, and low returns of wild fish. A little hope can go a long way when it comes to the pursuit. Wherever you can find a glimmer of confidence swinging a fly, anglers grab at it. Tying beautiful flies in unique color patterns not only inspire confidence, but also help to enhance the experience. Decompressing from a day out in the elements in the cabin, sipping on an aged reserve, while chatter fills the small space is a perfect opportunity to tie something special. So, pack along your vise and materials for your next adventure into the wild as the days are short and the nights long. Continue reading “Cabin Fever Fly Tying”

5 Reasons Why Fly Fishing is Good For You

5 Reasons Why Fly Fishing is Good For You

Fishing is one of the great American pastimes as a poll has revealed that as many as 33 million people aged 16 or older participate in the activity. Recreational fishing ranks even higher than playing basketball, soccer, softball or bowling, and more Americans fish than play golf and tennis combined. Apart from the satisfaction of catching your own fish, fly fishing has many health benefits, and it also has been shown to improve one’s quality of life. If you’ve never tried fly fishing before, you may want to try it out sometime to see how it can impact your entire well-being. Continue reading “5 Reasons Why Fly Fishing is Good For You”

Fly Tying Tools Of The Trade

Fly Tying Tools Of The Trade

If you’re anything like me, walking into the local fly shop and throwing down $3.00 for a fly is just painful. I remember purchasing a big hopper in Eastern Idaho for a specific stretch of water. Given the cost, I “wisely” opted to buy only one. Three casts later, a large brown took it off the surface as soon as the bug hit. After what seemed like a few seconds he broke me off, and my hopper was never seen again, at least, not by me. It is experiences like this that have led me to tie my own flies, as well as times I’ve fished waters with zero luck, only to notice the hatches and make mental notes. After some time at the vise and a little creativity, I’ve come back with my own fly and left with success. But, if your Grandpa didn’t teach you to tie and you’re new to the sport, where should you start? Below are a few of the essential tools of the fly tying trade. All recommendations are items that I personally own and tie flies with. Continue reading “Fly Tying Tools Of The Trade”

The Road Less Travelled

The Road Less Travelled

To state the obvious: there are many ways to get to Yellowstone National Park. It is a huge tract of land (over 3,472 square miles) lying at an odd-shaped joining of Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana. Most guide books recommend that if you have time, and trust me, you will want to set aside a bit of time, then plan to spend a few days in the different parts of the park with accommodation nearby. This will cut down on travel time and allow you to immerse yourself in the experience a whole lot more. Continue reading “The Road Less Travelled”