Fly Fishing: The Season of Orange

Fly Fishing: The Season of Orange

Halloween is around the corner and it seems that everywhere you look you can’t escape the color orange. While changing leaves, pumpkin patches, and snack-sized peanut butter cups abound, for fly fisherman, the color orange presents a different appeal—one that triggers a ferocious take, the arching bend of the rod, and the screeching sound of line peeling from the reel. Everyone’s go-to fall color is universally appealing for both humans and fish alike.

As the weather cools and you hunker down in your fly tying cave before sneaking out for some pre-winter time on the water, it’s important to embrace orange and use it to your advantage. Here are four great ways to put a little more orange into your fly box. Continue reading “Fly Fishing: The Season of Orange”

How to Tie a Beadhead October Caddis Pupa Fly: Video

How to Tie a Beadhead October Caddis Pupa Fly: Video

The Beadhead October Caddis Pupa, also know as the Great Autumn Sedge is a go to caddis pupae imitation. Tied with a soft hackle and segmented coloration this fly can be very effective if fished at the right time. Look for the emergence of these bugs to happen later in the day, sometime between September and November. The more leaves you see falling to the ground the better. It is also a great top fly in a tandem rig with a small midge imitation trailing.

Now let’s see what you can do. #avidmaxflytyers

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How to Tie a Poison Tung Fly: Video

How to Tie a Poison Tung Fly: Video

Developed by Carlie Craven, this pattern is a great midge imitation. He developed this pattern with a light body, blue ribbing and a grey collar creating a fly that is unique and will fool fish in picky situations. Our variation is a dull version tied with a dark gray body and black ribbing rather than the blue. You can also tie it in various browns and with different tints of blue wire. This is a must for any winter tailwater fishers box.

Now let’s see what you can do. #avidmaxflytyers

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How to Tie a Bead Head Flashback Pheasant Tail Fly: Video

Anyone who has fly fished for a few days knows the Pheasant tail nymph (PT). It has been around for over half a century and will fool fish forever in many different fishing situations. Created by Frank Sawyer, it is a great imitation for Mayflies and Stoneflies depending on the sizing and color variation. This pattern can be tied anywhere from 12 all the way down to 24, or beyond if you can. I fish them larger in the summer months typically in 14 – 18 and then smaller in the fall 18 – 24. Our version features a bead head as well as a flashback while omitting the legs that make it an “American version”. Fish it as your point fly in smaller variations and as your lead fly in larger sizes.

Now let’s see what you can do. #avidmaxflytyers

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How to Tie a Mercury Midge Fly: Video

Created by the Colorado tailwater specialist Pat Dorsey, this pattern is a go to for any fly angler. As a midge pupa imitation, it can be fished year round wherever water is accessible and is of most importance in the winter months when fish are keyed almost exclusively on midges. The Mercury Midge is a pattern that was evolved from the Black Beauty when Pat added the silver lined bead to the head. The idea behind this is that it imitates the bubble that is created when a midge begins is emergence. Tied in small sizes from 18 – 24 and fished in weighted nymph rigs or as the point fly with a larger attractor pattern above.

Now let’s see what you can do. #avidmaxflytyers

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How to Tie a Bead Head Brassie Fly: Video

A simple but very effective fly. Originating on the South Platte in Colorado in the 1960’s this pattern has been evolving ever since. When it was created it was tied with a copper body and shrink wrap for the head. Today it is tied almost universally with peacock hearl while on a variety of hooks. Traditionally this is tied in very small sizes 18 – 24 as it is commonly imitating midges. Our version is slightly larger. This variation I tie in sizes 12 – 16 with a thicker body to imitate later summer caddis nymphs such as Green Sedge and Little Sister Sedge. Fish it with some smaller midges on a weighted nymph rig or as a point with a larger attractor above.

Now let’s see what you can do. #avidmaxflytyers

 

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How to Tie a Soft Hackle Pheasant Tail Fly: Video

The Soft Hackle Pheasant Tail is my favorite fly! It can be fished on tailwater and freestone rivers and imitates a variety of insects. Most people would say that it is a Mayfly Nymph, but it also imitates a small stonefly or caddis as well. You primarily use it for a late spring and summer fly, because this is when the mayflies are most active. It can also be fished in a smaller size year around, even in the winter though.

The Soft Hackle Pheasant Tail is a great fly when the mayflies are emerging or actively free floating in the current. When a mayfly nymph is in the current, it spreads it’s legs out wide and floats helplessly. This is where the soft hackle on the Pheasant Tail comes into play. When the pheasant tail is wrapped around the hook, the fibers stand up, thus giving it the appearance of having the gills on the body (as seen in the picture). It can be tied in sizes #12-20 in order to imitate all types of mayflies and is best when fished on a nymph rig or dropped below a dry fly as a dropper.

Now let’s see what you can do. #avidmaxflytyers

 

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How to Tie a Prince Nymph Fly: Video

The Prince Nymph is one of those flies that just works! Some say it is a stonefly nymph, others say it is an attractor, but I think that it is both. The dark body looks a lot like a stonefly and it also works very well on freestone rivers, where stoneflies are common.  The prince nymph is by no means easy to tie. It does take a fair bit of practice to master it and I must admit, I am still practicing! The Prince Nymph can be tied is size #08-18. My personal favorite is a #16. You can add a gold bead if you like as well. The Prince Nymph was invented many years ago, well before my time. It continues to be a favorite among fly fisherman to this day.

Now let’s see what you can do. #avidmaxflytyers

 

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How to Tie a Bloom Caddis Fly: Video

The Bloom Caddis is a very deadly caddis pattern developed by Dave Bloom on the Missouri River. It is one of those patterns often overlooked by most people. While everyone else is using Elk Hair Caddis and Stimulators, the Bloom Caddis will often catch fish when others fail. The naturally mottled body and “spikey” dubbed thorax is the key to the flies success. Caddis often have mottled bodies and wings, and this is what the Bloom Caddis imitates. A great pattern to have in your caddis box, and easy to see too!!

Now let’s see what you can do. #avidmaxflytyers

Continue reading “How to Tie a Bloom Caddis Fly: Video”